Monday, September 18, 2017

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/greening-our-streets_b_7512830.html

Greening Our Streets

Saturday, September 16, 2017

I can see enormous benefits to daylighting rivers, not unlike removing dams, but there is a problem with the utopian (progressive) impetus for it.
IMO, the only reasonable motive for public action is to preserve life (including your own). Thinking you can improve a place by removing what is there and replacing is a little like killing the villagers to preserve the village. Once you remove wholesale what other earlier people built, however destructive and flawed originally, you are removing life preserving information. You are using the same hubristic approach that produced these flawed structures to start with.
Now, with hindsight, it's not that you can't improve the past structures, but you first have to appreciate them and change them according to their own intrinsic characteristics (their "forms," etc.). Rather than daylight the entire section of river, creating a separate (and separtatable) park space, it would be more preservationist to create "fingers" of daylighted space that seek to mesh with the urban environment around it. That way, you don't lose "memory," you don't have a massive (simplified) superimposed system to manage, and you spread the management responsibility around to nearby stakeholders. You might get rid of some NIMBY resistance to daylighting that way too.

https://www.planetizen.com/node/94724/bringing-urban-rivers-back-daylight

Friday, September 15, 2017

"Our consumption of sand is outpacing our understanding of the economics and environmental impacts of extracting, transporting, and consuming it, finds research published last Thursday in the journal Science. Out of the complexity of the global sand trade has emerged something of a butterfly effect, in which an economic decision in one place can wreak social and environmental havoc on the other side of the world. "

https://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2017/0914/It-s-a-small-world-after-all-say-scientists-warning-of-sand-scarcity

An instinctive approach to the surrounding environment has led me away from using sand for construction. I find that, for all practical purposes, anything you can do with sand can be done equally well with paper pulp mixed with latex paint. It is lighter and has better thermal qualities than sand. But sand has advantages through speed of application and indisputable fire retardancy. (BTW, densely packed paper pulp that is then dried allows no air circulation within its mass, and is therefore fire retardant.)

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Trees bring economic benefit to a sampling of cities

https://www.citylab.com/environment/2017/08/how-much-are-trees-worth-to-megacities/537972/?utm_source=SFTwitter

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Yes, nicely described dynamics, which is in line with historical accounts and human nature.
That’s why we can assign high priority to scenarios of at least attempted command style economies post crash, mileage may vary, it would be immediately unsuccessful in some parts of the world, resulting in further cascading chaos and or small governable areas, while working for a while in other places. Obviously with the proviso there is no fulls scale global nuclear/.. war knee jerk reaction, and also at least some %% of regions will be able, willing to commit resources to cool nuclear waste pools for a couple of more years, before longer terms disposal etc.

Leave a ReplyCancel reply

Yes, nicely described dynamics, which is in line with historical accounts and human nature.
That’s why we can assign high priority to scenarios of at least attempted command style economies post crash, mileage may vary, it would be immediately unsuccessful in some parts of the world, resulting in further cascading chaos and or small governable areas, while working for a while in other places. Obviously with the proviso there is no fulls scale global nuclear/.. war knee jerk reaction, and also at least some %% of regions will be able, willing to commit resources to cool nuclear waste pools for a couple of more years, before longer terms disposal etc.

Leave a ReplyCancel reply

Monday, September 11, 2017

adonis says:
absolutely if the land is used for resilient fruit trees a 1 % chance is better than nothing im thinking citrus trees are very resilient and provide great medicinal value and nourishment
  • I hadn’t heard about citrus as a remedy for radiation. It should be well researched, And to the extent that it helps, it should be planted very widely. (That would be in warmer climates than mine.)
    There’s a kind of potassium supplement that I know of–not just any potassium, but I forget which kind.
    Beyond using land to plant trees (which can be a very complex issue due to soil condition, land ownership and such) I think of land use planning as being optimal planning for a given jurisdiction of land. People living near nuclear plants could be rewarded to store fuel, and be able to monitor radiation, dispense remedies, have an evacuation plan, plant and manage appropriate forestries, be trained to manage nuclear facilities as feasible, etc. There should also be a water storage plan that is pretty much fail safe, with lots of redundancy…
  • Beyond using land to plant trees (which can be a very complex issue due to soil condition, land ownership and such) I think of land use planning as being optimal planning for a given jurisdiction of land. People living near nuclear plants could be rewarded to store fuel, and be able to monitor radiation, dispense remedies, have an evacuation plan, plant and manage appropriate forestries, be trained to manage nuclear facilities as feasible, etc. There should also be a water storage plan that is pretty much fail safe, with lots of redundancy…
JT Roberts says:
Turgot 1766
“The land has also furnished the whole amount of moveable
riches, or capitals, in existence, and these are formed only
by part of its produce being saved each year.”
“Not only does there not exist nor can there exist any
other revenue than the net produce of lands, but it is also
the land which has furnished all the capitals which make
up the sum of all the advances of agriculture and commerce.
It was that which offered without tillage the first
rude advances which were indispensable for the earliest
labors, all the rest is the accumulated fruit of the economy
of the centuries that have followed one another since man
began to cultivate the earth. This economizing has doubtless
taken place not only out of the revenues of the proprietors
but also out of the profits of all the members
of the working classes.
It is even generally true that,
although the proprietors have a greater superfluity, they
save less because as they have more leisure, they have more
desires and more passions, they regard themselves as more
assured of their fortune, they think more about enjoying
it agreeably than about Increasing It luxury is their inheritance.
The wage-receivers, _ and especially the undertakers
of the other classes, who receive profits proportionate
to their advances, to their talent and to their activity,
although they have no revenue properly so called, have yet
a superfluity beyond their subsistence, and almost all of
them, devoted as they are to their undertakings, occupied
in increasing their fortunes, removed by their labor from
expensive amusements and passions, save all their superfluity
to invest it again m their business, and so increase
it.
Most of the undertakers in agriculture borrow little,
and scarcely any of them seek to make a profitable employment
of anything but their own funds. The undertaker
in other employments, who wish to make their fortune,
stable, also try to get into the same position: and, unless
they have great ability, those who carry on their enterprises
upon borrowed funds run great risk of failing.
But, although capitals are partly formed by saving from the
profits of the working classes, yet, as these profits always
come from the earth, inasmuch as they are all paid,
either from the revenue, or as part of the expenditure
which serves to produce the revenue, it is evident that
capitals come from the land just as much as the revenue
does, or, rather, that they are nothing but the accumulation
of the part of the values produced by the land that
the proprietors of the revenue, or those who share it with
them, can lay by every year without using it for the satisfaction
of their wants.”
JT says: Turgot was a Physiocrat
If you carefully read his conclusion and reflect on the global economy as it mirrors France in his day you will see clear parallels.

Other comment: “It is even generally true that,
although the proprietors have a greater superfluity, they
save less because as they have more leisure, they have more
desires and more passions, they regard themselves as more
assured of their fortune, they think more about enjoying
it agreeably than about Increasing It”
Or it would seem that they think about enjoying it agreeably while increasing it lazily, greedily and short sightedly, without ensuring its long term continuity.